Estate Planning Seminars

ESTATE PLANNING VIRTUAL SEMINAR SERIES

Presented By Freedom Federal Credit Union

Foundations of Estate PlanningFundamentals of Estate Planning
Learn from a panel of experts on how to get your Estate in order. Freedom Federal Credit Union, in partnership with The Kelly Group, is hosting this FREE virtual seminar covering what you need to start your Estate Planning, and how to confidently make a plan to care for your loved ones.

Wednesday, November 18th, 2020
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

 

In this seminar, we will cover:
· The importance of Estate Planning
· How to get your personal and financial affairs in order in case of incapacity or death
· How to preserve your property and investments for loved ones
· How to avoid family disputes
· Estate tax implications

Registration for this free virtual seminar is required, and can be done ONLINE.

We hope to see you there!

 

Next Seminar…

Beyond Estate Planning, How to Leave Your Greatest Legacy

Legacy Planning brings the human element into estate planning. What would happen to your loved ones if something should happen to you?  Would they have a process to follow, or would their world be engulfed in chaos? This seminar takes you beyond estate documents, discussing how you can convert chaos to clarity and closure. Legacy Planning follows a logical progression, and each participant will be given a workbook for planning purposes.  Legacy Planning is a dynamic process that is not hard—you just have to get started!   

Wednesday, January 13th, 2021
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Registration for this free virtual seminar is required, and can be done ONLINE.

IS NOW A GOOD TIME TO OPEN A HELOC?

Is a HELOC a good idea

If you’re looking to fund a home improvement project, or if the economic devastation of COVID-19 has left you in need of cash, consider tapping into your home’s equity with a home equity line of credit, or ‘HELOC’.

What is a HELOC?

A HELOC is a revolving credit line allowing homeowners to borrow money against the equity of their home. Borrowers can withdraw money as needed during a set amount of time known as the “draw period,” which generally lasts 10 years. Some lenders place restrictions on HELOCs and require borrowers to withdraw a minimum amount of money each time they make a withdrawal, regardless of need. Other restrictions include the requirements to keep a fixed amount of money outstanding or to withdraw a specific sum when the HELOC is first established; however, borrowers are typically free to spend the money however they please.

Most homeowners are eligible for a HELOC with a debt-to-income ratio that is 40% or less, a credit score of 620 or higher and a home assessment that stands at a minimum of 15% more than what is owed.

How do I repay my HELOC?

Repayment of HELOCs varies but is generally flexible.

Many lenders collect interest-only payments during the draw period, with principal payments being strictly optional. Others require ongoing monthly payment toward both principal and interest.

When the draw period ends, some lenders require borrowers to pay back the entire loan “balloon” amount. Others allow borrowers to pay back the loan in monthly installments over a new time period, known as the “repayment period.” Repayment periods are generous, lasting as long as 20 years.

What are the disadvantages of a HELOC?

A HELOC places your home at risk of foreclosure if not repaid. Before opening a HELOC, it’s a good idea to run the numbers to ensure you can easily meet the payments.

Also, many lenders require the full payment of the HELOC after the draw period is over. This can prove to be challenging for many borrowers.

Finally, if you don’t plan to stay in your home for long, a HELOC may not be the right choice for you. When you sell your home, you’ll need to pay the full balance of the HELOC.

A HELOC can be a great option now

HELOCs have variable interest rates, which means the interest on the loan fluctuates along with the general interest rate, sometimes dramatically.

The economic fallout of COVID-19 has generated historically low interest rates. The average APR for fixed 30-year mortgages has hovered at the low 3% for months now, and experts predict it will continue falling. The low rates make it an excellent time to take out a HELOC with manageable payback terms.

The economic uncertainty the pandemic has generated also makes it a prime time to have extra cash available for any need that may arise.

Now may be the perfect time for you to refinance your current mortgage, from another loan provider, into a lower rate from Freedom Federal Credit Union! We offer a wide range of programs with low rates and great terms. Contact us about a refinance option that meet your needs today.

About Freedom Federal Credit Union

Freedom serves and is open to anyone who lives, works, worships, attends school, volunteers, or has family in Harford or Baltimore County, MD. As a credit union, we are committed to putting you first, not shareholders, and helping you achieve your financial goals. Learn more at freedomfcu.org or call us 800-440-4120 to see how we can help.

Your Turn: Are you looking to sell your home? Tell us about it on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. @FreedomFedCU

Millennials Hit Hardest by Coronavirus Recession

Millennials hit hardest by COVID-19

The coronavirus recession hasn’t been easy on anyone, but millennials may have been hit hardest.

According to many economic experts, the 73 million millennials in the U.S. could experience financial setbacks from COVID-19 that have a longer-reaching impact than those experienced by any other age group.

Here’s why the coronavirus pandemic has been especially hard for those in 25- to 39-year-old age bracket.

Another recession for millennials

Economic recessions are nothing new for this demographic. They already lived through the Great Recession of 2008, and for many, the impact of the last recession is still being felt today.

The Great Recession hit millennials when they were still in college or just starting out on their career paths. For some, it meant the choices for their first post-college job were very slim. For others, it meant dropping out of college when there was no longer a guarantee of a degree netting them a higher-paying job. Regardless of how they were impacted, many millennials are still playing catch-up from the recession of 2008.

“For this cohort, already indebted and a step behind on the career ladder, this second pummeling could keep them from accruing the wealth of older generations,” says Gray Kimbrough, Washington, D.C. economist and American University professor.

Job losses across the board

More than 40 million workers in the U.S. have filed for unemployment since the beginning of the pandemic, but this is another area where millennials have been hit harder than most.

According to a recent report by Data for Progress, 52% of respondents under age 45 have lost jobs, been furloughed or had their work hours cut due to COVID-19. In contrast, just 26% of respondents over age 45 have suffered a job loss of some kind during the coronavirus pandemic.

Millions of millennials have lost jobs that are impossible to do while adhering to social distancing mandates. At the height of the economic lockdowns in April, the economy shed a staggering 20.5 million jobs. Of these jobs, 7.7 million were in the leisure and hospitality sector — a sector that is dominated by millennials. An additional 1.4 million lost jobs were in health care, primarily in ambulatory services — another field that employs a disproportionately large number of millennials.

No nest egg

Many millennials who are still on the rebound from the Great Recession are carrying piles of debt and have minimal savings — or none at all.

According to surveys conducted in 2018 by the Federal Reserve, 1 in 4 millennial families have a negative net worth, or debts that outweigh their assets. One in six millennials would not be able to find the funds to cover a $400 emergency. For these young employees, a relatively mild setback from the coronavirus can be devastating to their finances.

Millennials also tend to neglect their retirements. A recent report by the National Institute on Retirement Security found that 66% of millennials in the workforce have nothing put away for their retirement.

Can millennials recover?

Millennials had still not fully recovered from the Great Recession when the coronavirus pummeled the economy. They have shouldered a large share of job losses and have little or no savings to fall back on.

But there is hope. Millennials may not be as young as they were during the Great Recession, but they still have time to bounce back. They can use the unique challenges presented by the coronavirus pandemic as an opportunity to reevaluate their career track and move onward toward a brighter future.

This age group, also known as Gen Y, is famous for its resilience and can-do attitude. They’ve gotten through the Great Recession of 2008 and they’ll beat the coronavirus recession, too. With hard work, perseverance and small steps toward a better future, millennials can pull themselves up and regain their financial health.

If you’re experiencing financial difficulties, we can help. Call, click or stop by Freedom FCU to speak to a member service representative today.

Your Turn: Are you a millennial who has been impacted by the coronavirus recession? Tell us about it on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. @FreedomFedCU